£25m road resurfacing programme rolled out

Bucks County Council top priority road repair scheme launch on the A413 at Winslow.From the left,Mark Rowe,Cllr David Rowlands and Kirk Adams.'110816M-A011
Bucks County Council top priority road repair scheme launch on the A413 at Winslow.From the left,Mark Rowe,Cllr David Rowlands and Kirk Adams.'110816M-A011

THE rumble of heavy machinery, and the accompanying tailbacks, on roads across the county on Tuesday signalled the launch of Transport for Buckinghamshire’s (TfB) two-year road resurfacing programme.

“This is very much a good news story,” beamed a hard-hatted David Rowlands, Bucks County Council’s cabinet spokesman for transport, as the Advertiser team met up with the road repairs crew on the A413 at Winslow.

The resurfacing programme, entitled We’re Working On It, follows the announcement in May by new BCC leader Martin Tett, that the repair of the county’ roads would be a top priority.

He announced a £25 million budget to be spent over the next two years on a repair programme drawn from county council members’s top priorities. Each of 57 members was asked to list their top five priorities for repair.

Mr Rowlands said: “Today we’re launching our cabinet members’ major programme of improving the roads.

“It’s a very exciting time when the leader of the county council has decided roads will be a priority for taxpayers’ money over the next two years.

“I’m delighted we’ve been able to bring forward these schemes.

“The new approach to identify which roads get repaired directly involves all county councillors, who have the great advantage of knowing their local areas. They also receive information from their residents so they have been well placed to tell the TfB engineers which roads they feel are most in need of repair.”

The stretch of road between Winslow and the Addington was being treated by a process called surface dressing, which involves spraying the road with a coating of hot bitumen and then covering it with stone chippings. This forms a water-resistant layer which seals the surface.

Mark Rowe, service leader for Ringway Jacobs, which delivers highway services for the county council, said: “Surface dressing is one of the most cost-effective treatments, as it is quick and less disruptive. Sometimes we can’t avoid closing roads but we keep roads open whenever we can, and we do try wherever we can to avoid peak-hour traffic.”

Other types of surfacing works in the programme include:

Slurry seal micro-surfacing – where a cold-mixed thin asphalt is laid over the existing surface;

Plane and patch – where the worst-affected areas are planed out and replaced;

Structural haunching or reconstruction– where the road structure is dug out and replaced right down to its foundation.

> Visit www.transportforbucks.net/Roadworks-Centre/Where-are-we-today.aspx