Big problems for HMP Aylesbury as report published

Peter Clarke, Chief Inspector of Prisons published a report on HMP Aylesbury Today
Peter Clarke, Chief Inspector of Prisons published a report on HMP Aylesbury Today

The Independent Monitoring Board has highlighted what they see as the four main problems with Aylesbury Prison in their latest annual report.

They have suggested they’re having a significant detrimental effect on the safety, fair treatment and rehabilitation of prisoners.

The following four main issues have been identified by the board as having a significant detrimental effect on the safety, fair treatment and rehabilitation of prisoners at HMPYOI Aylesbury.

They are the following:

(1) The recruitment and retention of staff employed at the prison, which is linked to pay and conditions and further exacerbated by long security clearance waits prior to starting employment.

(2) The amount of purposeful activity provided.

The total number of sessions provided by the prison is a disappointing 40% of the total required for full prisoner engagement in activity.

Around 35% of the prisoners were attending no employment or activity sessions at all, at the end of the year.

(3) The maintenance and degradation of the structure and fabric of the prison.

(4) The length of time prisoners spend in segregation when transfer to other prisons is required, given the lack of any formal arrangement between prisons.

Further reports from the prison state that it has become a more dangerous place to be, with an increase in violent crime over the last year.

There has been from 1st July 2016 to 30th June 2017: 500 incidents of self-harm, 246 ACCT plans opened to monitor prisoners deemed to be a danger to themselves, 17 serious assaults on staff, 237 prisoner-on-prisoner assaults 74 prisoner-on-staff assaults, 182 fights and 2 alleged sexual assaults.

The IMB put the increases in violence down to a direct result of the worsening staffing situation at Aylesbury.

The budget allows for 180 prison officers, including senior ranks, but only 160 were actually employed at the end of the reporting year.

The average length of service for the prison officers who resigned during the reporting year was 14 months, ranging from 28 months to one week.

This is after full training.

Have you worked at the Prison or do you know anybody who has, who would like to share their experiences?

Get in touch!

Editorial@bucksherald.co.uk