Last chance to visit historic mosaic

Boris Johnson at Waddesdon Manor at the opening of the exhibition, Predators and Prey: A Roman Mosaic from Lod, Israel. PNL-140906-121309001
Boris Johnson at Waddesdon Manor at the opening of the exhibition, Predators and Prey: A Roman Mosaic from Lod, Israel. PNL-140906-121309001
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Time is running out for history enthusiasts who haven’t yet visited a rare Roman mosaic pavement which is currently on display.

Excavated in Israel, the Lod Mosaic forms the centrepiece of a special exhibition in the Stables Coach House at Waddesdon Manor.

In 1996 a splendid series of Roman mosaic floors was accidentally discovered during roadworks in Lod, just outside Tel Aviv.

Finally excavated in 2009 by the Israel Antiquities Authority, the largest and most elaborate of them has toured to museums internationally, including the Louvre in Paris, New York’s Metrolitan Museum and the the Altes Museum in Berlin.

It has been on display at Waddesdon Manor since June, when the the exhibition, Predators and Prey: A Roman Mosaic from Lod, Israel, was opened by Mayor of London Boris Johnson.

The exhibition is open until November 2.

The site of Lod has been consistently occupied since antiquity, with limited archaeological activity.

This makes the discovery of the Lod mosaic all the more exceptional, hinting at the Roman treasures which may still remain hidden.

Contemporary and contextual objects from the Middle East, kindly lent by the British Museum, are displayed alongside material from Lod to illuminate its wider background.

Part of the exhibition highlights the historical involvement of the Rothschild family in archaeological projects in the region, using material from the archive and collections at Waddesdon.

The mosaic is on loan from the Israel Antiquities Authority and the Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre.

Entry to exhibition is free to visitors paying the grounds admission charge of £8 (children £4, under-fives and National Trust members free).