London’s Calling: For Holmes fans it really is elementary

Sherlock Holmes exhibition at Museum of London
Sherlock Holmes exhibition at Museum of London

Britain’s biggest exhibition on Sherlock Holmes for more than 60 years has opened at the Museum of London.

A major highlight is author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s notebook, containing the first ever lines about the iconic detective.

In the notebook he plots out an initial dramatic storyline of a ‘terrified woman rushing up the cabman’. The title, ‘A Tangled Skein’ is crossed out and replaced with ‘A Study in Scarlet’ – the first Holmes novel.

The Victorian metropolis where the detective lived is laid bare with world class photos, maps, paintings and drawings.

There’s also a model of a hansom cab, a telegraphical receiver and some of the clothes associated with the great detective, including the Belstaff coat and and Derek Rose dressing gown worn by Benedict Cumberbatch in the BBC Sherlock Series.

There’s also the Wall of Rats set on loan from the programme’s studio.

Holmes’ global popularity is also reflected with memrobilia from across the world such as film posters and radio plays.

Adult tickets for the exhibition are £12 (£10.90 without donation), concession tickets (ages 12-15, students, over 60, unwaged and registered disabled) £10 (£9 without donation) and flexible family tickets for 3-6 people (must include at least one child and one adult) are £9.50 per person (£8.50 per person without donation).

The museum is located near St Paul’s Cathedral. Entry to its permanent galleries are free.