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Asia takes on Africa for free student-run festival

The free African Vs Chinese Festival is happening outside the Beloff Lawn at the university on Saturday September 6 from 10am to 5pm. PNL-140822-164812001

The free African Vs Chinese Festival is happening outside the Beloff Lawn at the university on Saturday September 6 from 10am to 5pm. PNL-140822-164812001

Drummers from The Gambia, food from Nigeria and acrobats from China can all be found in one place at a free student-run cultural festival.

Second year student at The University of Buckingham, Denzil Bankole, has already staged one market event at the home of MK Dons Football Club so decided to bring it to Buckingham.

It is part of his business model for the BSc Business Enterprise course he is on at the university and is based on an event run by his mum in East London.

Along with the drummers and acrobats at the event, there will also be a Chinese dancing lion and an Afrobeat DJ as entertainers from Asia and Africa go head-to-head to win over the crowds.

Denzil describes the show as ‘an outdoor event with cultural and artist representations from eight different countries’.

The idea is that the entertainment ‘cuts across the continents’ to showcase some of the ‘best of African and Asian artefacts, music, food and other cultural memorabilia’.

The free African Vs Chinese Festival is happening outside the Beloff Lawn at the university on Saturday, September 6 from 10am to 5pm.

The BSc Business Enterprise course was introduced in 2006 as the world’s first Venture Creation Programme for which students pitch, start up and run their own business.

Businesses have included the UK’s first sustainable wooden computer mouse, an environmentally-friendly festival hygiene pack and a student kit of household items for new undergraduates.

Denzil wanted to bring a taste of different cultures to the town so he approached programme director Nigel Adams with the idea.

Mr Adams said: “Denzil is one of those people that when he comes to your office, he fills up the door.

“He’s quite noticeable and very entrepreneurial. His work has blossomed recently, much to his own surprise.

“The entreprenerial types sometime struggle with the academic side but he’s doing better than expected.”

Mr Adams said the concept of a market show is an effective one because people like to see unusual things, from different countries.

This year, there are 29 students on the course but Mr Adams, who acts as the chairman for each of the students’ businesses, is hoping to boost numbers each year.

He said: “I’m not just looking for your Alan Sugars and your Richard Bransons. It’s the people that you see around those types – the ones that pick up the pieces, the stable ones, they take a theory and use it straight away.

“These type of people are vital in business, otherwise it ends up in total chaos.”

 

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