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Startling cancer statistics released in report by Brain Tumour Research

Representatives from Brain Tumour Research and Taylan's Project outside the Houses of Parliament on July 1. They presented a report on brain tumour research to MP David Willetts. PNL-140707-171221001

Representatives from Brain Tumour Research and Taylan's Project outside the Houses of Parliament on July 1. They presented a report on brain tumour research to MP David Willetts. PNL-140707-171221001

One in 50 people who die under the age of 60 die of a brain tumour according to a report by a local charity.

Padbury-based Brain Tumour Research presented their report to MP David Willetts, Minister of State for Universities and Science at the House of Commons earlier this month.

The report is an update to the National Research Funding report issued by the charity in July last year.

It presents new facts about the impact of the disease – one in 50 people who die under the age of 60 years are dying from brain cancer and 71 per cent of those who die of a brain tumour will be under 75 years old, compared to 47 per cent for all cancers.

The report calls for more research funding into brain tumours. According to Brain Tumour Research only one per cent of national cancer research spending looks into brain tumours compared to 55 per cent spent on researching cancer of the breast, leukaemia, bowel and prostate.

Accompanying representatives from Brain Tumour Research was Figen Rawlinson, of Calvert Green-based group Taylan’s Project, whose son passed away from a brain tumour in 2009, aged seven.

She said: “Taylan’s diagnosis and untimely loss of life was a tragedy and the woeful underfunding for research makes it a tragedy on top of a tragedy.

“Knowing that each year, 16,000 people face hearing the devastating news they have been diagnosed with a brain tumour and that just 18.8 per cent of those diagnosed will survive beyond five years, compared with an average of 50 per cent across other cancers, is a bitter pill for families in this situation to swallow.

“We desperately need to massively increase the funding available for research into this cruel disease if we are to ultimately find a cure.”

Sue Farrington Smith, chief executive of Brain Tumour Research, said: “We know funding into brain tumours needs to increase to around £30 million to £35 million a year over a 10-year time frame. At the current rate of spend, it could take 100 years to find a cure.

“We are also calling on the Government to introduce a national register of site-specific cancer research to track all research grants and research work, ensuring transparency of funding arrangements. This will allow shortcomings to be identified and prevent duplication of work.”

 

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