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Tribute paid to first vice-chancellor

Sir Alan Peacock, former vice chancellor of the University of Buckingham and former chief economic advisor to the department of trade and industry ENGPNL00120110610125749

Sir Alan Peacock, former vice chancellor of the University of Buckingham and former chief economic advisor to the department of trade and industry ENGPNL00120110610125749

The first vice-chancellor at the University of Buckingham has died aged 92.

Sir Alan Peacock was vice chancellor at the university between 1980 and 1984. He also served on the Arctic convoys during the Second World War.

He belatedly received the Arctic Star in 2013 and as a young man was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for sustained gallantry as a naval officer.

He was married to Margaret for 67 years until her death three years ago. The couple had three children. Sir Alan died on August 2.

Paying tribute to Sir Alan, former university vice chancellor, Terence Kealey, said on the University of Buckingham website: “Sir Alan Peacock, who was our second principal and then first vice-chancellor, was one of the greatest individuals to have been associated with the university.

“Alan Peacock’s work as an academic economist was of such quality that he was elected to a fellowship of the British Academy (the UK’s leading humanities academy).

“His public service was of such wisdom (his 1986 report on funding the BBC has moulded all subsequent debate over the issue) that he was knighted.

“And his standing in Scottish life (Alan was a Scot and on retirement he returned to Edinburgh where, amongst other activities, he helped found the David Hume Institute) was such that he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, that nation’s preeminent academy.

“At Buckingham his greatest achievement was to have negotiated our Royal Charter, which turned us from a college into a university. There was huge resistance to our being awarded such a charter, and Alan had to bypass the civil servants and work discreetly with the then minister of education, Rhodes Boyson, to negotiate it. It was characteristic of Alan that one of the first matters he pressed on me when I became vice-chancellor was to urge that Rhodes receive an honorary degree – which of course he did.

“Buckingham was created by a galaxy of giants but of them Alan was the greatest. He will be missed for as long as the University of Buckingham is remembered.”

 

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