A picture says a thousand words

Artist Susannah Fiennes and Sir Martin Jacomb at the unveiling of his portrait at The University of Buckingham.'111007M-A867
Artist Susannah Fiennes and Sir Martin Jacomb at the unveiling of his portrait at The University of Buckingham.'111007M-A867
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A PORTRAIT of Sir Martin Jacomb, former chancellor of the University of Buckingham, was unveiled on Friday last week to a host of VIPs, friends of the university and staff.

Traditionally portraits are painted of each chancellor and vice-chancellor upon their retirement.

Sir Martin was chancellor between 1998 until 2010, taking over the post from Lady Thatcher after her retirement. He contributed immensely to the university, giving us the benefit of his wisdom and his connections and the university grew vigorously during his term of office.

The portrait, painted by Susannah Fiennes, took 27 hours to complete, over a period of six months.

Susannah said of Sir Martin: “Martin instinctively understood that being painted isn’t just a passive endeavour, but involves active participation from the sitter. He was a pleasure to paint and will be a tough act to follow.”

The portrait unveiling was followed by lunch and a speech by the university’s vice-chancellor, Professor Terence Kealey, who told guests: “Martin was never afraid to take risks, to put his neck on the line for the greater good of the university and was nothing other than a professional.”

Sir Martin had a long and distinguished career in the City of London. Currently chairman of Canary Wharf Group and Share PLC, in Aylesbury, he was chairman of Prudential from 1995 to 2000 and was on the boards of Rio Tinto and Marks and Spencer.

Other directorships included chairman of Barclays de Zoete Wedd from 1986 to 1992, chairman of Postel Investment Management Ltd from 1991 to 1995, deputy chairman of Barclays Bank from 1985 to 1993, and director of the Bank of England from 1986 to 1995.

Sir Martin told guests: “I’ve loved being chancellor here. I’ve been sandwiched between two very distinguished chancellors, Margaret Thatcher, my predecessor and Lord Tanlaw, my successor.”