Jim Davidson (review)

Jim Davidson
Jim Davidson

Sex and the Jimmy Savile scandal were inevitably the topics of choice to open comedian Jim Davidson’s one night show at Aylesbury Waterside Theatre on Friday night and he came out with the gloves off for a no holds barred show.

The Jim’ll Fix It music launched the two-hour performance and the entertainer appeared to tumultuous applause from loyal fans who knew exactly what to expect.

Davidson admits himself that some people dismiss him as a washed-up has-been and there’s no denying that, as the years have rolled by, he has gone from smiley family TV personality to a bitter and twisted angry man.

He’s accused of being a bigot, anti-gay, racist, sexist, a misogynist and every other -ist you can think of. Taking a pop at JD is a national sport among some members of the press and modern “cutting-edge” comedians.

But he’s good at what he does and he does it very well. He knows his audience – they are inevitably white, straight, and working class - and they know what to expect from him. He pulls no punches, insulting pretty much everyone he can think of. He doesn’t excuse his sometime extreme opinions and he refuses to make concessions.

Jim is totally non-PC and proud of it. Where younger comedians tread on eggshells for fear of offending he makes the barbs his stock-in trade.

He attacks fellow showbiz personalities (playing a guessing game with the audience in naming suspected paedophiles, perverts and homosexuals), politicians and athletes but tells wonderfully affectionate stories about friends like boxer Frank Bruno, Vinnie Jones and Katherine Jenkins. He also makes frequent references to the fantastic work he does entertaining British troops in war zones.

Gags about Savile, a frequent visitor, of course, to Aylesbury’s Stoke Mandeville Hospital, took up most of the first half and had everyone doubled up with laughter.

Perhaps it’s a generational thing. Jim said himself that younger people were often horrified at his controversial style of humour but I didn’t stop laughing for a second. He may be too blue for TV but he’s great value for money on stage. A tremendous night Jim. Thanks.

ANNE COX