New technology lets parents spy on where their kids go in the family car

New technology lets parents spy on where their kids go in the  family car
New technology lets parents spy on where their kids go in the family car

Skoda has revealed a new technology which lets parents who share a car with their children monitor where they go and set up alerts if they stray too far from home.

In a move sure to be welcomed by concerned parents and cursed as nanny state madness by young drivers, the Czech firm has introduced a geofencing option to its connected car system.

The system is part of the Skoda Connect internet-connected car service and allows owners to set approved areas on a map as well as identify no-go zones.

Should the car stray beyond the approved area then the owner is alerted via an app on their smartphone, leading to some potentially awkward conversations when their children get home.

Skoda says the system is ideal for parents who don’t want their recently qualified offspring straying too far from home or racking up big miles in the family car when they claim they’re just “popping to the shops”.

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It also means they’ll be able to tell if their youngsters spend every evening sitting in a McDonalds car park.

(Picture: Skoda)

The system works in one of two ways; users can set an approved “green” area on the map in which the car is allowed to move freely. Using the car’s GPS system to track its movements and the in-built internet connectivity, the owner will be notified via the app on their smartphone if the car moves outside this area, meaning parents will know if their kids venture further afield than they’ve agreed.

Alternatively, parents can identify a “red” area in which they don’t want the car driven at all and will receive an alert if the car enters that zone.

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For families where lots of people are using the same car, the geofencing function can be tailored to be active only on set days and times and multiple different zones can be set up for different drivers, with up to four area notifications active at the same time.

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